Epilepsy: More than Seizures

Having epilepsy on its own can seem like a tall mountain to climb for any child, but kids with epilepsy often struggle with other things like sleep, diet and learning.

Sleep and Epilepsy

Sleep is an essential part of managing epilepsy and getting too much or too little sleep can have a significant effect on children with epilepsy. Eight to ten hours of quality sleep per night and sticking with a sleep routine is a recommended way to help prevent seizures.

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How to Talk to Friends About Epilepsy

Having epilepsy isn’t like getting braces, going to the movies, or getting your first cell phone – not every teen goes through it. So understandably, it can be tough for children and teens to talk to their friends about epilepsy and how they can help in the moment of a seizure.

Starting the conversation might be a little uncomfortable, but your child may be pleasantly surprised at how understanding and helpful their friends will be. There is a good chance they will take an interest in wanting to learn more about epilepsy and could become part of the support team.

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We Are Our Own Worst Critics

Our own worst critic

This week is National Eating Disorder Awareness week (#NEDAwareness), and this year’s theme is “Come as you are.” This theme sends a message to individuals at all stages of body acceptance and eating disorders recovery that their stories are valid. It also speaks to people with body image issues to “be you,” instead of “being the unattainable version of you that the eating disorder voice is urging.” In patients with eating disorders, these unattainable goals are often not limited to weight or looks; many also aim for flawlessness in grades, sports, and other activities. As many of my patients say, “I need to be perfect.” This blog is dedicated to them.

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