The Common Cold and Your Child

It’s called the “common” cold with good reason; it’s the most common infectious disease in the United States. The common cold responsible for more school absences than any other illness. Most kids under age five can have 6-8 colds per year and the symptoms can last seven to fourteen days.

This contagious infection of the upper airway (nose, throat, and sinuses) is caused by a virus. A cold virus is spread from a sick person to others by sneezing or coughing or contact with the hands or mouth. A cold virus can live on toys, phones, door knobs, tables, and other objects for up to three hours and transfer to a child’s hands. The virus gets on a child’s hands and is transferred to the nose, mouth, or eyes by normal face touching habits.

Read more

I Beg You, Stop Vaping.

I know that there have been quite a few blogs about vaping recently (and you may be sick of reading about this in the news), but I’m writing this as a request from several parents and patients. Even as I write this, I’m sitting in a meeting getting briefed on the most recent cases of lung injuries related to vaping.  I am receiving multiple calls and patient questions daily about this. This is an ongoing thing, and each day it gets bigger and bigger.

Read more

New Classification System of Type 1 Diabetes

For many parents of children with type 1 diabetes, the life-changing diagnosis comes suddenly: The child has become dehydrated, resulting in a trip to the emergency room and sometimes life-threatening complications. Recently, researchers developed a classification system for the different stages of diabetes to help them understand how the disease progresses and identify type 1 diabetes before it progresses to a dangerous level.

Read more

Back to School with a Chronic Illness

Getting ready to start a new school year can be a time of anxiety and even stress for any family, but especially those families who are managing a chronic illness.

In the weeks before school starts, it can be helpful to begin transitioning back to a school year routine – that might include going to bed and getting up earlier, maybe even shifting eating schedules to more closely align with the school day.

Read more
1 2 3 104