Parent’s Guide to Pain Prevention

Does this situation sound familiar?

“You have a doctor appointment for a check-up today after school.”

“Am I going to get a shot? I hate shots. I don’t think I want to go to the doctor today.”

Before the age of 2 years old, the CDC recommends children receive 24 immunizations. While this sounds like a lot of shots, and it is, immunizations are one of the Public Health initiatives that have resulted prevention of the most deaths and disability early in life.

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Iron Deficiency

Iron deficiency is the most common micro-nutrient deficiency in the world and the largest group at risk includes pregnant women and young children. Iron is very important in child development, especially in the brain. In fact, iron deficiency during infancy can negatively impact thinking and emotions, behavior, movement, vision and hearing, learning and even memory. The younger the child, the greater the risk these effects are long-term. Therefore, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends universal screening of iron deficiency at 12 months of age. Read more

Pumping for Your Baby

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends “exclusive breastfeeding for about six months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for one year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.” There are times when mothers are not able to directly breastfeed their infants. This can be by choice, separation of mom and infant or medical needs of either mom or infant. Some mothers will then choose to pump their milk to provide to their baby. It is the next best way for babies to get their nutrition.

Here are some tips for pumping for your baby:

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Sandbox Safety

This may be one of those “I’d rather not know what’s really in there” moments. But despite the appeal of sandboxes, those communal gathering spots of the 4-year-old set may not be as innocent as they appear.

Like swimming pools – which we enter with a certain amount of forcing ourselves not to think about what’s really in that water – the shared sand space contains the residue of all who have entered it. That includes bacteria, parasites and other infectious germs carried by kids and – depending on the location of the sand – animals. The difference is that the sandboxes don’t have chlorine or other agents to help kill off some of the germs.

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