Measles Outbreaks Highlight the Importance of Vaccines

Measles outbreak

Most parents of school-age kids are way too young to recall how prevalent measles was in its heyday. A very serious, highly contagious respiratory disease that affects the lungs and respiratory tract, measles affected 3 to 4 million people in the United States each year before vaccination began in 1963. Back then, measles — which can be passed on through a cough or sneeze — put 48,000 people in the hospital and killed 500 people annually.

With vaccinations routinely given to children for the past 55 years, it’s easy to assume that measles has been totally wiped out. Unfortunately, as more children in school show up without being vaccinated, measles outbreaks have popped up more frequently. Just this year, more than 100 cases have been confirmed in 21 states — especially in Washington and Oregon – with most cases diagnosed in children who have not had the routine MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

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Burn Dangers in the Kitchen

It’s National Burn Awareness Week and our Burn Center wants to help you prevent burns. Scalds were the most common injury for children in the Burn Center in 2018. One place where scalds and burns happen is the kitchen. As children grow, they like to try out their independence. And that may mean trying to “help” mom or dad in the kitchen.

Keep kids safe in the kitchen with these tips to avoid accidental burns:

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Phthalates and BPA

Whether grocery shopping or buying household goods, you’ve likely seen items – from soup cans to plastic containers – labeled BPA-free. But what is it and why does it matter?

Bisphenol-A (or BPA) is a chemical that is used in the creation of certain types of plastics (polycarbonates), as well as in the coating on the inside of metal food and beverage containers to prevent corrosion and leakage.

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The Long Game: Promoting Positive Relationships with Food

“I wish that they would eat more vegetables.”

“He won’t eat anything that’s not macaroni and cheese.”

“She has such a sweet-tooth – I think that she would eat candy forever if she could!”

“My child eats when bored or upset.  How do I help them stop?”

“I want my child to have a healthy relationship with food, so I don’t want to make it a stressful topic.  How do I do that and still help them make healthy choices?”

Healthy eating is obviously important to health and well-being, and it’s something that every family has to grapple with in one way or another. Our relationship with food is important, but it’s also complicated. Many parents feel pulled in multiple directions when trying to help their children develop healthy eating habits.

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