Type 1 Diabetes and Foot Health

After an especially long winter, it’s finally time to enjoy the warmer weather, get out the flip flops, and enjoy the great outdoors! It’s also a common time for kids and families with diabetes to ask questions about foot health. Many of us know someone who suffers from diabetic neuropathy, a complication of diabetes. Thankfully, it’s rare for kids with diabetes to have foot problems, but it’s a good time of year to pay more attention to their feet and learn how to prevent problems down the road.

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Epilepsy: More than Seizures

Having epilepsy on its own can seem like a tall mountain to climb for any child, but kids with epilepsy often struggle with other things like sleep, diet and learning.

Sleep and Epilepsy

Sleep is an essential part of managing epilepsy and getting too much or too little sleep can have a significant effect on children with epilepsy. Eight to ten hours of quality sleep per night and sticking with a sleep routine is a recommended way to help prevent seizures.

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How to Talk to Friends About Epilepsy

Having epilepsy isn’t like getting braces, going to the movies, or getting your first cell phone – not every teen goes through it. So understandably, it can be tough for children and teens to talk to their friends about epilepsy and how they can help in the moment of a seizure.

Starting the conversation might be a little uncomfortable, but your child may be pleasantly surprised at how understanding and helpful their friends will be. There is a good chance they will take an interest in wanting to learn more about epilepsy and could become part of the support team.

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Measles Outbreaks Highlight the Importance of Vaccines

Measles outbreak

Most parents of school-age kids are way too young to recall how prevalent measles was in its heyday. A very serious, highly contagious respiratory disease that affects the lungs and respiratory tract, measles affected 3 to 4 million people in the United States each year before vaccination began in 1963. Back then, measles — which can be passed on through a cough or sneeze — put 48,000 people in the hospital and killed 500 people annually.

With vaccinations routinely given to children for the past 55 years, it’s easy to assume that measles has been totally wiped out. Unfortunately, as more children in school show up without being vaccinated, measles outbreaks have popped up more frequently. Just this year, more than 100 cases have been confirmed in 21 states — especially in Washington and Oregon – with most cases diagnosed in children who have not had the routine MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

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