Identifying Developmental Delays

Early identification of children with delays in their development is important because there are programs that can help boost their progress in key areas and make them more successful as they start school. Well-child checks are an important time to monitor development in speech, motor skills like walking and hand-eye coordination, and social skills like smiling, playing with others, and using their imagination.

Recently, formal questionnaires have been developed for parents to fill out that help families and their doctor track a child’s progress in these key areas. Parents are experts on their own children, and these questionnaires are a good way to tap into that expertise.

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Be Safe, Baby: A New Class for Parents

Having a baby is a very exciting time for parents, and one important thing that should not be overlooked when preparing for your newborn is safety.

Be Safe, Baby! A Class for Expectant Parents

Beginning in October, the Madison Area Safe Kids Coalition with support from Kohl’s Cares will offer a free class for expectant parents to learn the safety essentials for newborns.

Register now at uwhealthkids.org/besafebaby

Classes are free and will be offered at various UW Health clinics in Madison and surrounding communities, and feature car seat education, safe sleep, and the period of purple crying.

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Max’s Story

Our son, Maxwell, was born in September, 2011 in Madison WI. The pregnancy had been uneventful, so we were taken by surprise when we learned that Max would need to be taken up to the NICU due to having difficulty breathing. We were soon informed that our newborn son was placed on a ventilator and would need to be rushed to American Family Children’s Hospital. We were able to go to the NICU and touch Max’s feet as the hospital staff was scurrying around organizing the specialized transport that Max would need to make his journey across the city.

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New Parents and Sleep: What to Expect

Newborn Sleep, What to Expect

Ah…sleep. It seems so precious and limited when babies are young. New parents quickly learn not to take a good nights’ sleep for granted. When should breastfed babies be expected to sleep throughout the night?

Sleep is a work in progress during the first year of a baby’s life. There is no easy answer.

The First Month

In the first few weeks after birth, babies almost always fall asleep at the end of nursing. Their tummies are full, they just worked for their meal by actively nursing, and they are warm and cozy in mom’s arms. Who wouldn’t take a snooze after this?

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