Measles Outbreaks Highlight the Importance of Vaccines

Measles outbreak

Most parents of school-age kids are way too young to recall how prevalent measles was in its heyday. A very serious, highly contagious respiratory disease that affects the lungs and respiratory tract, measles affected 3 to 4 million people in the United States each year before vaccination began in 1963. Back then, measles — which can be passed on through a cough or sneeze — put 48,000 people in the hospital and killed 500 people annually.

With vaccinations routinely given to children for the past 55 years, it’s easy to assume that measles has been totally wiped out. Unfortunately, as more children in school show up without being vaccinated, measles outbreaks have popped up more frequently. Just this year, more than 100 cases have been confirmed in 21 states — especially in Washington and Oregon – with most cases diagnosed in children who have not had the routine MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

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Burn Dangers in the Kitchen

It’s National Burn Awareness Week and our Burn Center wants to help you prevent burns. Scalds were the most common injury for children in the Burn Center in 2018. One place where scalds and burns happen is the kitchen. As children grow, they like to try out their independence. And that may mean trying to “help” mom or dad in the kitchen.

Keep kids safe in the kitchen with these tips to avoid accidental burns:

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Phthalates and BPA

Whether grocery shopping or buying household goods, you’ve likely seen items – from soup cans to plastic containers – labeled BPA-free. But what is it and why does it matter?

Bisphenol-A (or BPA) is a chemical that is used in the creation of certain types of plastics (polycarbonates), as well as in the coating on the inside of metal food and beverage containers to prevent corrosion and leakage.

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Breastmilk Oversupply – Is This a Problem?

You may be aware of the benefits of breastfeeding and/or breastmilk for both the baby and the mother. These include, but are not limited to fewer and shorter illnesses for the baby and reduced cancer risk for moms. The American Academy of Pediatrics “recommends exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant.” Most mothers in the US attempt to breastfeed and one of the most common hurdles mothers face is low milk supply. The opposite of low milk supply, oversupply can also be a problem. One may wonder why oversupply is a problem, more of a good thing is usually good, right?  Read more

Soothing a Teething Baby

Soothing a Teething Baby

Soothing a Teething BabyYou’ve just gotten your baby to bed. Relieved, you sit down to read a book or head to the laundry room to get clothes out of the washing machine. After what feels like no time at all, your baby wakes up—again—fussy and miserable. What could be the cause? … Teething.

Caring for a teething baby can be a challenge. Babies tend to be fussy as their teeth come in. Teeth usually come in when a child is between 4-7 months old. Gum irritation, irritability and drooling are the most common symptoms.

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