Blog posts by UW Health

Vaping Injuries

UW Health has seen an increase in serious injuries from vaping devices. In the past year, we treated five patients, up from zero the year before. The majority of the injured were middle and high school aged teens. While fires and explosions from vaping are considered rare, these incidents can be life altering for victims. 

An e-cig device or battery can explode while it is being carried, like in a shirt or jeans pocket. When it explodes, it can start clothing on fire, which makes it difficult to remove the clothes or even put out the fire. As a result, burns occur suddenly and close to sensitive areas such as the face, hands, even the legs and genitals. Several of the patients seen at University Hospital for e-cigarette related injuries required skin grafting because the burns were severe.

Read more

Measles Outbreaks Highlight the Importance of Vaccines

Measles outbreak

Most parents of school-age kids are way too young to recall how prevalent measles was in its heyday. A very serious, highly contagious respiratory disease that affects the lungs and respiratory tract, measles affected 3 to 4 million people in the United States each year before vaccination began in 1963. Back then, measles — which can be passed on through a cough or sneeze — put 48,000 people in the hospital and killed 500 people annually.

With vaccinations routinely given to children for the past 55 years, it’s easy to assume that measles has been totally wiped out. Unfortunately, as more children in school show up without being vaccinated, measles outbreaks have popped up more frequently. Just this year, more than 100 cases have been confirmed in 21 states — especially in Washington and Oregon – with most cases diagnosed in children who have not had the routine MMR (measles, mumps and rubella) vaccine.

Read more

Burn Dangers in the Kitchen

It’s National Burn Awareness Week and our Burn Center wants to help you prevent burns. Scalds were the most common injury for children in the Burn Center in 2018. One place where scalds and burns happen is the kitchen. As children grow, they like to try out their independence. And that may mean trying to “help” mom or dad in the kitchen.

Keep kids safe in the kitchen with these tips to avoid accidental burns:

Read more

Michael and “Shakey” Make Great Partners in the Fight Against Cystic Fibrosis

When she learned that her son had cystic fibrosis, mom didn’t know much about the disease. Today, the Jones family advocates for finding a cure. 

Traci Jones vividly recalls the 9 a.m. phone call from her pediatrician’s office just nine days after her third child, Michael, was born in 2014.

“We have Michael’s newborn screening results,” said the clinician. “We need to see you at 12:30 this afternoon.”

Accompanied by her mother, a nurse, Traci recalls very little from the 40-minute visit with her pediatrician.

Read more

Daxton’s Heart was in the Right Place

Amber Noggle was 20 weeks pregnant when she went in for what she expected to be a routine ultrasound.

Once the scan was complete, Amber got nervous as several more medical staff entered the room. The next words she and her husband, Dustin, heard changed everything immediately.

“We need to talk. It’s about your baby boy’s heart.”

Suddenly, Amber learned that the baby she was carrying had a rare, complex heart defect called tetralogy of fallot with pulmonary atresia. Babies with this defect have five abnormalities: completely obstructed blood flow from the heart to the lungs; a hole between the heart’s lower chambers; an overriding aorta; a thickened right ventricle; and abnormal pulmonary arteries. Major surgery is typically performed not long after the baby’s birth.

Read more

1 2 3 4 12